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DANIEL MELE
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HISTORY

The bodhrán is an irish frame drums ranging from 25 to 65cm (10" to 26") in diameter, with most drums measuring 35 to 45cm (14" to 18"). The sides of the drum are 9 to 20cm (3½" to 8") deep. A goatskin head is tacked to one side (although nowadays, synthetic heads, are sometimes used). The other side is open ended for one hand to be placed against the inside of the drum head to control the picht and timbre. One or two crossbars, sometimes removable, may be inside the frame, but this is increasingly rare on professional instruments. Some professional modern bodhráin integrate mechanical tuning systems similar to those used on drums found in drums kit. The bodhrán was used during the Irish rebelion of 1603, by the Irish forces, as a war drum, or battle drum. The use of the drum was to provide a cadence for the pipers and warriors to keep to, as well as anounce the arrival of the army. This leads some to think that the bodhrán was derived from an old Celtic war drum. The bodhrán is similar to the frame drums distributed widely across northern Africa from the Middle East and has cognates  in instruments used for Arabic music and the musical traditions of the Mediterranean region (see Music of North Africa, Music of Greece etc.). Traditional skin drums made by some Native Americans are very close in design to the bodhrán as well.

 

 

Methodology:

 I PROVIDE PC MUSIC SOFTWARE FOR WINDOWS 64 BITS
FOR RHYTHM READING WITH REAL BODHRAN  SOUNDS, WHICH MAKES LEARNING EASIER.

Tuning way
Playing position
Musical terminology
Different types of beating
Musical reading
Different figures: quintillo, double time, sixteen notes triplet, quarter notes triplet
Meters: odd meters: 5/8 7/8 11/8 13/8 and zorcico 10/8
Compound meters: 6/8 9/8 12/8
Different styles:
Rells, Jigs, Slip Jigs,Hornpipe, Polka
Paradidles method and its techniques by Daniel Mele
Accent method by C:Wilcoxon
Rhythms to accompany recorded music.
Polyrhythms
Improvisation development