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DANIEL MELE
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HISTORY

A few instruments have a clear origin as the Flamenco Cajon. it was introduced by Paco de Lucia from Peru in the 1970’s and it was adapted to a national style by Ruben Damtas, percussionist. It’s clear the artist was spelled not only by the sound that he had heard from the Peruvian “criollos” but also by the possibilities to substitute and enforce the only ways of percussion that the gender admitted: palms and beating on the guitar back.
It’s true that some rhythms of the Flamenco (martinete) were accompanied by a hammer and the anvil at the Andalusian forges and it is usual that the singer that hasn’t got another instrument uses the fingers to beat the table. But till that time the intention to give the Flamenco a percussion style had been tested without any result.

 

 

Methodology:

Playing position
Musical terminology
Different types of beating:
high tone, dark tone, both hands roll, foot beat,
fingers and palms techniques, appoggiatura, mordentes
Musical reading
Different figures: quintillo, double time,  sixteen notes triplets, quarter notes triplets,
Meters: odd number meters: 5/8 7/8 11/8 13/8 and zorcico 10/8
Compound meters: 6/8 9/8 and 12/8
Different styles: bulerias, seguiriya, guajira, Flamenco  tango, Cadiz tango, etc.
Slow time fills
Scores analysis, study and reading
Rhythm accompanied by recorded music
Polyrhythms

Improvisation development
Assembling