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DANIEL MELE
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HISTORY

This is the word used to name a variety of small drums of African roots. It’s a pair of different size drums. The smallest drum is called “male” and the biggest one is called “female”. They are a principal component of latin music as  a solo instrument.. You play them sitting down and they are held between your knees.In the 1920’s they were tuned in a lower tone and they were played similar to the congas.The skin was pierced with lttle nails and the player used to put a little piece of charcoal between his feet to mantain the syntony. Nowadays it is tuned in a higher tone in order to play better as a solo in the rhythm section. He modern technique is based on how to play the bongo that is called the “hammer” The player can play other instruments such as bells particularly when the volume and the rhythm are more intense.

Methodology:

Tuning way
Playing position
Musical terminology
Different types of beating; open tone, dark tone, low tone, slap, dark ring tone (hammer), two hands roll, appoggiatura.
Musical reading
Different figures: quintillo, double time, sixteen notes triplet, quarter notes triplet
Meters: odd meters: 5/8 7/8 11/8 13/8 and zorcico 10/8
Compound meters: 6/8 9/8 12/8
Different styles: Brasilian, salsa, candombe, guaguanco, bomba, cumbia, mazacote, guaracha, merengue, columbia, Cuban conga, Afrocuban, etc.
Fills for slow tempos
Paradidles method and its techniques by Daniel Mele
Accent method by C:Wilcoxon
Scores analysis, study, and reading
Rhythms to accompany recorded music.
Polyrhythms
Improvisation development
Assembling.